Persona composer Shoji Meguro leaves Atlus to create indie games


A close-up screenshot of the Joker from Persona 5.

Persona 5: Strikers is the last game Meguro worked on as an employee of Atlus.
Screenshot: Atlus

Japanese composer Shoji Meguro announcement that he left Atlus, resigning from the Tokyo-based games company last September.

“I have been creating role-playing games myself in my spare time for five years now”, Meguro written in an official statement, adding that he decided to leave Atlus to focus on his dream of developing indie games.

Meguo had applied to enter the Kodansha Game Creators Lab and was selected as a finalist. This apparently inspired him to create full-time indie games. (Full disclosure: My first two books were published by Kodansha.)

Meguro joined Atlus in 1995, cutting his teeth in 1996 Revelations: Persona. While at Atlus, he collaborated musically with Tetsuya Kobayashi, Toshiki Konishi, and Atsushi Kitajoh, among others. He mostly worked on Shin megami tensei and Personage securities. He also directed the PSP remakes of Shin Megami Tensei: Persona and Persona 2.

Meguro also composed music for the Personage anime, including featured animated movies. Most recently he worked as sound director on Persona 5: the attackers.

“However, I will continue to have a good relationship with Atlus,” Meguro wrote. “While focusing on developing my own independent game, I will continue to work with Atlus on the music for the game, so I hope those of you who were concerned about the sudden announcement will feel relieved.”

“Finally, I would like to thank Atlus Co., Ltd. and my family for their support,” he added. “I also want to thank Kodansha for giving me the chance to take on the challenge.”

In Japan, it is not uncommon for game composers to continue writing music for their former employers after becoming freelance. It’s good to see that Meguro was close to making a deal that benefits himself and Atlus.



Source link

Previous Composer Toshio Hosokawa receives prestigious Goethe Medal
Next Boston composer resuscitates 19th-century ghost stories for Halloween